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Tulip Poplar

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Tulip Poplar

Liriodendron tulipifera

Family: Manoliaceae

Leaf Type: Deciduous

Mature Height: 45+ m (150+ ft)

Fall Color: Yellow

Native Range: Tulip poplars are native to Tennessee and range throughout the entire east-southeastern United States.

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Features

Tulip poplars are deciduous, meaning they lose their leaves in the fall. The leaves are very distinctive and help give the tree its common name as they are shaped like a tulip. Tulip poplars are a flowering tree that typically starts blooming mid-spring. The flowers are yellow-green with orange at the base and look similar to tulips, also contributing to the tree’s name. The fruit of these trees are known as samaras and look like papery wings that are spread by the wind. They form a coned cluster before opening and falling in the winter.

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Fun Facts

● Tulip poplars are the state tree of Tennessee and are named for the flower’s and leaf’s resemblance to a tulip flower!
● They are one of the largest hardwood tree species in the U.S.

“If Trees Could Sing” is a project of The Nature Conservancy that highlights several recording artists and demonstrates the importance of trees. Check out what Annie Sellick has to say about tulip poplars. 
Learn More

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Did you know that trees provide homes for animals, keep us cool and clean our air? Click here to learn more about the benefits that trees provide to us and our world.

This site has a rich human history, including the story of the Bass Street Community, one of the first Free Black neighborhoods in Nashville. Click here to learn more about St. Cloud Hill and its many inhabitants over the years.

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