Policy Update:

Masks are required for all children ages 3 to 11 years old. Please click here to learn more under the mask policy dropdown.


White Oak

white oak1

White Oak

Quercus alba

Family: Fagaceae

Leaf Type: Deciduous

Mature Height: 24-30 m (80-100 ft)

Fall Color: Brown, orange-red

Native Range: White oaks are found throughout the majority of the eastern half of the United States.

whiteoak2

Features

White oaks can grow to be massive, long-living trees. When in a forest, they grow much taller than when they grow alone. However, when grown alone, they can sometimes be as wide as they are tall. The average life of a white oak is between 200 and 300 years with some estimated to live more than 600 years. A tree that old would have been alive when Galileo made his first observations in a telescope in 1607. The leaves of the white oak are bright green on top with 7-9 rounded lobes and are approximately 5-8 inches long. The base of the leaf is v-shaped. As with all oaks, the fruit of the white oak is an acorn. The acorns are ¾ to 1 inch in size and are oblong in shape. They are frequently eaten by wildlife including squirrels and chipmunks.

whiteoak3

Fun Facts

● This tree gets its name from the white-colored characteristic of the underleaf.
● The white oak is the state tree of Illinois, Maryland, and Connecticut.
● White oak wood is used to make wine and whiskey barrels. Bourbon whiskey is almost always aged in white oak barrels.

“If Trees Could Sing” is a project of The Nature Conservancy that highlights several recording artists and demonstrates the importance of trees. Check out what David Olney has to say about white oaks. 
Learn More

TheNatureConservancy

Did you know that trees provide homes for animals, keep us cool and clean our air? Click here to learn more about the benefits that trees provide to us and our world.

This site has a rich human history, including the story of the Bass Street Community, one of the first Free Black neighborhoods in Nashville. Click here to learn more about St. Cloud Hill and its many inhabitants over the years.

©2021 Adventure Science Center
English